All posts by Jakub Saroun

Public lecture dedicated to the screening of the documentary “Where the Wind Blew”, November 22, 2017, 14:00-16:00

Where the Wind Blew

Public lecture dedicated to the screening of the documentary “Where the Wind Blew” followed by discussion with PNND representative

WHEN: Wednesday, 22 November 2017, 14:00–16:00

WHERE: Room no. 003, MUP Strašnice building, Dubečská 900/10, Prague 10

Free entry, but please fill out our on-line registration form here.

Poster.

Kulatý stůl: Rozvojová pomoc v zahraničí, 23. 11. 2017 od 17:15

Centrum bezpečnostních studií si vás dovoluje pozvat na kulatý stůl na téma Rozvojová pomoc v zahraničí: od globálních otázek a dilemat až po praktickou implementaci v terénu.

KDY: čtvrtek, 23. 11. 2017, 17:15

KDE: budova MUP Praha-Strašnice, Dubečská 900/10, místnost č. 205

HOST: PhDr. Mgr. Jiří Škvor, MBA (vedoucí oddělení rozvojové spolupráce a humanitární pomoci Charity ČR, druhého největšího aktéra v oboru v republice)

Prosíme o registraci na akci

Kulatý stůl: Globální rozvoj, násilí a terorismus, 15. 11. 2017 od 17:00

Centrum bezpečnostních studií si vás dovoluje pozvat na kulatý stůl na téma Globální rozvoj, násilí a terorismus. Různé přístupy ke globálnímu rozvoji nám umožňují pochopit příčiny násilí a terorismu.

KDY: středa, 15. 11. 2017, 17:00
KDE: budova MUP Praha-Strašnice, Dubečská 900/10, místnost č. 205
HOST: Radovan Dluhy-Smith (lektor na Univerzitě Palackého v Olomouci, dříve konzultant v OSN)

Prosíme o registraci na akci

PostDoc public lecture by dr. Izabela Surwillo: Securitizing energy: from geopolitics to energy democracy. November 21, 2017 from 16:00

WHEN: Tuesday November 21, 2017, 16:00-17:30

WHERE: Room no. 305, MUP Strašnice building, Dubečská 900/10, Prague 10

Free entry, no registration required.

Abstract: Energy security emerged as one of the ‘new’ security issues in the post-Cold War era. Due to its ‘total’ character it impacts all sectors of human activity as well as other security areas – political, societal and environmental included. However, the vast majority of energy security analysis tends to focus on the local and global market forces and narrowly defined economic indicators for operationalizing energy security. The mainstream research is also primarily conducted from a limited methodological perspective that often relies on economic modeling, but rarely includes qualitative data that would give more consideration to the multiplicity of local actors, agendas and perspectives. Yet, the contextual analysis of the energy security phenomenon shows that the realist focus on the geopolitics of gas/oil supply and the ‘zero-sum’ game of pipeline politics are only a part of the story. Similarly to the analysis of climate security, the security dynamics of the contemporary energy sector defies the logic of exception as the dominant and universal logic of security. Namely, not only the logic of risk, war and subsistence shape local energy security agendas, but the emerging logic of emancipation increasingly plays a role in different national settings. Characterized by the gradual democratization of energy systems, individuals as the referent objects of security, the rhetoric of social empowerment/liberation and reflexive security practice – the energy security logic of emancipation marks yet another mutation of the meaning and practice of energy security and has important policy consequences for the domestic contexts. The presentation will look at this phenomenon in greater detail at the example of Germany, Poland and Ukraine.

PostDoc public lecture by dr. Izabela Surwillo: Securitizing energy: from geopolitics to energy democracy. November 21, 2017 from 16:00

WHEN: Tuesday November 21, 2017, 16:00-17:30

WHERE: Room no. 305, MUP Strašnice building, Dubečská 900/10, Prague 10

Free entry, no registration required.

Abstract: Energy security emerged as one of the ‘new’ security issues in the post-Cold War era. Due to its ‘total’ character it impacts all sectors of human activity as well as other security areas – political, societal and environmental included. However, the vast majority of energy security analysis tends to focus on the local and global market forces and narrowly defined economic indicators for operationalizing energy security. The mainstream research is also primarily conducted from a limited methodological perspective that often relies on economic modeling, but rarely includes qualitative data that would give more consideration to the multiplicity of local actors, agendas and perspectives. Yet, the contextual analysis of the energy security phenomenon shows that the realist focus on the geopolitics of gas/oil supply and the ‘zero-sum’ game of pipeline politics are only a part of the story. Similarly to the analysis of climate security, the security dynamics of the contemporary energy sector defies the logic of exception as the dominant and universal logic of security. Namely, not only the logic of risk, war and subsistence shape local energy security agendas, but the emerging logic of emancipation increasingly plays a role in different national settings. Characterized by the gradual democratization of energy systems, individuals as the referent objects of security, the rhetoric of social empowerment/liberation and reflexive security practice – the energy security logic of emancipation marks yet another mutation of the meaning and practice of energy security and has important policy consequences for the domestic contexts. The presentation will look at this phenomenon in greater detail at the example of Germany, Poland and Ukraine.

No Data? No Problem! A Guide to Researching Contemporary North Korea. April 20, 2017 from 16:30

C4SS and Department of Security Studies cordially invite you to public lecture “No Data? No Problem! A Guide to Researching Contemporary North Korea”
WHO: Dr. Virginie Grzelczyk, Aston University, UK

WHEN: Thursday, April 20, 2017, 16:30–18:00
WHERE: Room no. 305, MUP Strašnice building, Dubečská 900/10, Prague 10

Free entry, no registration required.

In her lecture, Virginie will address questions of how you can research something that is so secret like contemporary domestic and international politics in North Korea. Having researched North Korean politics for most of her academic career, Virginie will base her discussion on different methodological approaches she utilised during her various research projects and trips to Korean peninsula to date.

The lecture and subsequent discussion provides a fantastic opportunity for MUP students and staff to gain lesser-known information on North Korean politics, but also guidelines on how to do research in societies that are non-transparent and secretive.

Dr. Virginie Grzelczyk is a lecturer in international relations at Aston University, specializing in security relationships and negotiation patterns over East Asia, and especially over the Korean Peninsula. Prior to joining Aston, she has held academic positions in the United States, New Zealand and France. Dr. Grzelczyk has studied in France and South Korea before receiving her PhD in Political Science from the University of Maryland. Dr. Grzelczyk’s recent publications have focused on the Six-Party Talks, energy security in the DPRK, reunification narratives and conceptualizing conflict on the peninsula. Her upcoming book (North Korea’s New Diplomacy: Challenging Political Isolation in the 21st Century, to be published by Palgrave in 2017) looks at North Korea’s foreign policy in light of new and under-researched external relations.